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Personal Trainers Beware #6: Older Shoulders

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Personal Trainers Beware #6: Older Shoulders


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SUSPENDED STRETCHING: ANTERIOR CHAIN

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SUSPENDED STRETCHING: POSTERIOR CHAIN

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Suspended Stretching: Rotator Cuff

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Suspended Stretching: Pec

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Suspended Stretching: Neck

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PERSONAL TRAINERS BEWARE #5: GROWING PAINS IN TEENAGERS

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PERSONAL TRAINERS BEWARE #4 ARTHRITIS

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PERSONAL TRAINERS BEWARE #3 SPONDYLOLISTHESIS

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PERSONAL TRAINERS BEWARE #2: HYPERMOBILITY

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PERSONAL TRAINERS BEWARE #1: ALTERED ANATOMY

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HOLDING PATTERN #8: Forefoot pressure

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Holding Pattern #7: Anterior Hip Closing

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Holding Pattern #7: Anterior Hip Closing Assessment

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HOLDING PATTERN #6: ELBOW BEHIND

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HOLDING PATTERN #5: CHIN PROTRUDING

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HOLDING PATTERN #4: CLOSING THE CHEST

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PULSE-PNF TECHNIQUE: MYOFASCIAL RELEASE PEC MAJOR

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HOLDING PATTERN #3: ELEVATED SHOULDERS

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HOLDING PATTERN #2: HYPEREXTENSION SPINE

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Holding Pattern #1 - Holding My Ribs Down

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GLUTEUS MEDIUS & 'TFL' RELEASE

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GLUTEUS MEDIUS PROGRESSION #5: THE I2 KNEEL

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GLUTEUS MEDIUS PROGRESSION #4: THE I2 KNEEL

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GLUTEUS MEDIUS PROGRESSION #3: The "Brooklyn Bridge" for Gluteus Medius

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GLUTEUS MEDIUS PROGRESSION #2: THE "DOUBLE BALL WRESTLE"

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GLUTEUS MEDIUS PROGRESSION #1: THE "DONKEY CLAM"

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Running Technique: Case Study

Today, we are looking at one in depth video assessment I did of a friend about 5 years ago (forgive the rather dated formatting!) - closely observing his gait and running mechanics and attempting to understand everything from his tight R hip, to his excessive L foot pronation, to his excellent posture and distance between his feet. He has a history of R knee Anterior Cruciate Ligament surgery - and I hope to put it all together for you nicely!
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Running Technique Error #6: Over-Striding

Over-Reaching is the most complex and also most common error, affecting almost every runner. It’s our natural tendency to reach ahead and plant the heel too far ahead of our body in order to propel ourselves to move forward. It’s also called “Over-striding”. It feels so natural to do this as a runner that it is the hardest and slowest thing to unlearn; so slow in fact that you can buy whole books on the subject, and take Running Technique classes just to develop your ability to improve this over months.

This video quickly introduces you to ex-Russian Athletics Coach extraordinaire Dr. Nicolas Romanov who has devoted his work around the globe to promoting and teaching what he has termed as “Pose Technique” - a way of running that emphasises the "circular movement" of the legs rather than the very common "oval movement”  which is when Over-reaching happens.


The biomechanics of why this is so damaging to the body are not hard to understand: your body is travelling forward over land in running via your feet hitting the ground repeatedly, so if you hit the ground too much in front, you are jarring with every step, creating a ‘braking force’ with the front leg. This jarring is especially pronounced if you are a heavy heel striker, because then the force rattles up though your joints and tendons creating a myriad of niggling and chronic injuries.

The knees are the joint region that suffers most - do yours too? If you are interested in some research done on the effect of Pose Technique I have done a small summary of that research here.

Regardless of the challenge, our Masterclass will help you to understand it better, and teach you some simple strategies to correct this with video replay, drills and even tubing - the end result will be a smoother, lighter, elegant run that hurts less!
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Running Technique Error #5: Foot Flicking

Watch a client’s feet as they individually lift behind their bodies: rarely does the foot not flick one way or the other.

The challenge with this technique error is three-fold:
1. You can’t see it yourself
2. It happens so fast you may need to do slow-mo to see it, and

3. It often is revealing of various existing muscle imbalances.

Therefore it can be hard to change. Imbalances that are common are Lateral Hamstring dominance over Medial Hamstring, shin Evertors dominance over Invertors, and even TFL dominance over Iliopsoas.

Can you in your mind picture how each those three muscle imbalances will affect the foot as it lifts behind the body in swing phase? Have a go!
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Running Technique Error #4: Lazy Lifting

So many of us are LAZY when lifting and swinging our feet through the air. Instead, we're keeping our foot too close to the ground and our knee too straight. If you let your leg hang too straight, in effect your leg-lever is longer than it could be, which takes more energy to haul through with each step and results in a volley of dysfunctions.
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Running Technique Error #3: One foot too heavy?

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Running Technique Error #2: Hunched Upper Body

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Running Technique Error #1: Overlapping Feet

Minimising injury through perfecting Running Technique is a small but critical element of our Masterclass. It really does matter how you run as to whether your risk of tissue overload is high or low. And coaching better technique will often turn down the pain experience immediately, if your client can make the changes effectively.
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Watch Out For: Low Back Imbalance

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Watch out for: Quad Imbalance

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Watch out for: Hip Muscle Imbalance

Did you know that most people have one hip that is more "Trendy" than the other?  One hip may demonstrate what textbooks have long called 'The Trendelenburg Sign" - or as we like to say, be the more "Trendy Hip". 


The "Trendy Hip" often exhibits signs of a classic muscle imbalance: Tensor Fascia Lata ('TFL") dominating Gluteus Medius. So, TFL is overactive, and the Gluteus Medius is weak and inhibited. 


This video will help you to pick it, and develop the Skill of Seeing which hip is poorly stabilising the pelvis; that is, which hip is 'Trendy'.
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Watch out for: Shoulder Socket-Ball Joint Muscle Imbalance

This video demonstrates how the Functional Movement of reaching up behind your back is very useful for assessment of any painful shoulder.
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Watch out for: Scapular Muscle Imbalance

This video is all about seeing Pec Minor dominance over Lower Trapezius, resulting in a dysfunctional pulling movement. Make sure you get clear on the "Lurch" - one of the easiest to assess through simple observation and practice!
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Butt Blaster: Targeting Gluteus Maximus for Corrective Exercise.

This video demonstrates a couple of drills for effectively targeting the glutes, especially the Gluteus Maximus.  Remember:
1. Pay attention to detail with cueing pelvis and knee position;
2. Static holds and SLOW tempo during functional loaded exercises, and 
3. The use of tubing is an effective way to isolate the movements needed. 

This is a long term challenge and you need very cleverly designed corrective exercises in order to actually be targeting Gluteus Maximus, because for a 'big guy' he can be very hard to find!
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Muscle Imbalance 5 - Hamstring Dominance

Hamstrings feel "tight" because they are OVERACTIVE and OVERUSED - which means the brain selects them excessively during loaded movements. There are various reasons for this (e.g., they may be weak, client may have poor squat and lunge technique, your training programmes may favour Hamstrings) however….true overactivity is a wiring problem in the brain. TRUE.

This is called Hamstring dominance, and it may inhibit these muscles in the posterior chain:
+ Gluteus Maximus in Hip / Low Back dysfunction, 
+ Quadriceps in Knee dysfunction (oooo that's controversial!), and 
+ Multifidus in Low Back Dysfunction.

This video gives you some powerful ideas on loosening with Myofascial Release and Trigger Pointing for the Hamstrings.
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Muscle Imbalance 4 - Outer Quads Dominance

This video demonstrates myofascial release of the Lateral Quads in two very different positions. Firstly, in a sitting position off stretch allows us to sink deeper into softening up those trigger points. You could say,"Turning down the excessive Base before turing up the Volume".

The other position we use is getting Lateral Quads and ITB on stretch on a weight bench, allowing a more superficial myofascial release, and then again incorporating Gluteal activation component. STUNNING!


Please note: This video should be used as a guide only and is not a substitute for the advice or prescribed course of treatment of qualified medical practitioners or physiotherapists. Participation in any of the exercises shown on this video is at your own risk.

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Rehab Practitioner - Hip Extension Mobilisation

This video is a Seatbelt Technique from our most advanced course - Rehab Practitioner. 

Try it after you have done the Myofascial Release and Trigger Point techniques.  


This loosening technique is just one of the many practical, effective tools that is taught in the Rehab Trainer courses by our great team of elite sports physiotherapists. Every course is jam-packed with techniques that Personal Trainers and Exercise Professionals can use with your clients to reduce pain and prevent injury. 

Please note: This video should be used as a guide only and is not a substitute for the advice or prescribed course of treatment of qualified medical practitioners or physiotherapists. Participation in any of the exercises shown on this video is at your own risk.

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Muscle Imbalance 3 - TFL Dominance

TFL Myofascial Release with PNF-Pulse Technique and Gluteal Activation
This video demonstrates demonstrates myofascial release of the TFL in two very different positions on Angus who is a rower. He squirms when we do the deeper trigger point technique! 

The other position we use is getting hip flexors on stretch on a weight bench, allowing real myofascial opening of the hip with a PNF-Pulse Technique, and then incorporating Gluteal activation component. MAGIC!

This loosening technique is just one of the many practical, effective tools that is taught in the Rehab Trainer courses by our great team of elite sports physiotherapists. Every course is jam-packed with techniques that Personal Trainers and Exercise Professionals can use with your clients to reduce pain and prevent injury. 

Please note: This video should be used as a guide only and is not a substitute for the advice or prescribed course of treatment of qualified medical practitioners or physiotherapists. Participation in any of the exercises shown on this video is at your own risk.

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Muscle Imbalance 2 - Posterior Cuff Dominance

This video demonstrates myofascial release of the posterior cuff group of muscles. This technique could realistically be considered one of the most powerful and effective methods available to help these types of challenging shoulder pains... pains that typically strike deep inside the shoulder on overhead and pressing movements when the supraspinatus tendon becomes pinched and scuffed in the Socket-ball Joint.

If this describes your shoulder pain, then get in and start a daily programme of this type of loosening work, and don't relent until the improvement starts to happen!

This loosening technique is just one of the many practical, effective tools that is taught in the Rehab Trainer courses by our great team of elite sports physiotherapists. Every course is jam-packed with techniques that Personal Trainers and Exercise Professionals can use with your clients to reduce pain and prevent injury.  

Please note: This video should be used as a guide only and is not a substitute for the advice or prescribed course of treatment of qualified medical practitioners or physiotherapists. Participation in any of the exercises shown on this video is at your own risk.
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Muscle Imbalance 1 - Pec Minor Dominance

In this video, I show you how to effectively loosen the very commonly overactive and shortened Pectoralis Minor. It may dominate various movement patterns and cause "movement sins" - suboptimal and subconscious movement patterns that may eventually result in overload of other body structures and cause pain. Pec Minor may dominate over Lower Trapezius for example, and prevent healthy scapula retraction, protraction and upward rotation. 

At a basic level, even the average client's poor posture will certainly require this type of myofascial loosening in order to give you the breakthroughs you are looking for!
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Thoracic Stiffness Assessment

https://vimeo.com/123740966
In this video, Australian Sports Physiotherapist ULRIK LARSEN demonstrates a quick, thirty-second test for thoracic stiffness. This assessment technique is unique in that it is not like other thoracic mobility tests you might come across, which are complicated by hip and shoulder mobility issues and are therefore messy to interpret.

The Rehab Trainer Thoracic Stiffness Assessment (that can then become a movement drill or warm-up exercise) is testing pure mid-upper-thoracic mobility… or lack of it.
If you are doing this as an exercise, consider warming up with 5 x 5 second holds, and building up to 10 x 10 second sustained holds near the end of your session.

This assessment test is just one of the many practical, effective tools taught in in the Rehab Trainer courses by our great team of elite sports physiotherapists. Every course is jam-packed with techniques you can use in every session with your clients to reduce pain and prevent injury.

Please note: This video should be used as a guide only and is not a substitute for the advice or prescribed course of treatment of qualified medical practitioners or physiotherapists. Participation in any of the exercises shown on this video is at your own risk.



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Aggressive Mobilisation of the Safe, Stiff Thoracic Spine

In this video, Australian Sports Physiotherapist ULRIK LARSEN demonstrates some techniques for aggressive mobilisation on clients with safe (and very stiff) Thoracic Spines, including:
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Prone position for any safe client.
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All Four's position for athletes needing overhead mobility.
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Stubborn stiffness of the Upper Thoracic spine leading to neck / headache issues.

These techniques are performed using the Posture Pro and Rehab Trainer dowel, which can be purchased from our online shop (link at top of page)


Please note: This video should be used as a guide only and is not a substitute for the advice or prescribed course of treatment of qualified medical practitioners or physiotherapists. Participation in any of the exercises shown on this video is at your own risk.


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Gentle Loosening of the Tricky Thoracic Spine

Gentle Loosening on Clients with Tricky Thoracic Spines
Gentle Loosening on Clients with Tricky Thoracic Spines - use these on any clients especially if they fit the descriptions of:
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Hypermobile or Flat Thoracic Spines 
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Diagnosed or suspicious of Medical Conditions related to the spine
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Pain is more than just niggling or easy to live with / experiencing pins and needles at anytime.

Please note: This video should be used as a guide only and is not a substitute for the advice or prescribed course of treatment of qualified medical practitioners or physiotherapists. Participation in any of the exercises shown on this video is at your own risk.


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https://vimeo.com/123740966
Muscle Imbalance 1 - Pec Minor Dominance
Muscle Imbalance 2 - Posterior Cuff Dominance
Muscle Imbalance 3 - TFL Dominance
TFL Myofascial Release with PNF-Pulse Technique and Gluteal Activation
Rehab Practitioner - Hip Extension Mobilisation
Muscle Imbalance 4 - Outer Quads Dominance
Muscle Imbalance 5 - Hamstring Dominance
Butt Blaster: Targeting Gluteus Maximus for Corrective Exercise.
Watch out for: Scapular Muscle Imbalance
Watch out for: Shoulder Socket-Ball Joint Muscle Imbalance
Watch out for: Hip Muscle Imbalance
Watch out for: Quad Imbalance
Watch Out For: Low Back Imbalance
Running Technique Error #1: Overlapping Feet
Running Technique Error #2: Hunched Upper Body
Running Technique Error #3: One foot too heavy?
Running Technique Error #4: Lazy Lifting
Running Technique Error #5: Foot Flicking
Running Technique Error #6: Over-Striding
Running Technique: Case Study
GLUTEUS MEDIUS PROGRESSION #1: THE "DONKEY CLAM"
GLUTEUS MEDIUS PROGRESSION #2: THE "DOUBLE BALL WRESTLE"
GLUTEUS MEDIUS PROGRESSION #3: The "Brooklyn Bridge" for Gluteus Medius
GLUTEUS MEDIUS PROGRESSION #4: THE I2 KNEEL
GLUTEUS MEDIUS & 'TFL' RELEASE
GLUTEUS MEDIUS PROGRESSION #5: THE I2 KNEEL
Holding Pattern #1 - Holding My Ribs Down
HOLDING PATTERN #2: HYPEREXTENSION SPINE
HOLDING PATTERN #3: ELEVATED SHOULDERS
PULSE-PNF TECHNIQUE: MYOFASCIAL RELEASE PEC MAJOR
HOLDING PATTERN #4: CLOSING THE CHEST
HOLDING PATTERN #5: CHIN PROTRUDING
HOLDING PATTERN #6: ELBOW BEHIND
Holding Pattern #7: Anterior Hip Closing Assessment
Holding Pattern #7: Anterior Hip Closing
HOLDING PATTERN #8: Forefoot pressure
PERSONAL TRAINERS BEWARE #1: ALTERED ANATOMY
PERSONAL TRAINERS BEWARE #2: HYPERMOBILITY
PERSONAL TRAINERS BEWARE #3 SPONDYLOLISTHESIS
PERSONAL TRAINERS BEWARE #4 ARTHRITIS
PERSONAL TRAINERS BEWARE #5: GROWING PAINS IN TEENAGERS
Suspended Stretching: Neck
Suspended Stretching: Pec
Suspended Stretching: Rotator Cuff
SUSPENDED STRETCHING: POSTERIOR CHAIN